EXOTIC COLD-PRESSED OILS & BUTTERS

Kokum Butter (Unrefined)

Oils from India: We source most of our rare oils and butters from wild grown silviculture based plantations, in and around the western coast of Maharashtra & Goa in India. We also source oils and butters from the abundant forests in Central India, ie. Eastern Maharashtra, Madhya Pradesh, Orissa etc. We work with cottage level oil producers in the western ghats of Maharashtra and small & medium scale oil manufacturers from Madhya Pradesh. 

Oils from Europe: Raw materials for our oils are sourced from silviculture based sources found in the ‘Forest steppes’ & ‘Carpathian mountains’ of Eastern Europe. These regions are abundant in wild-grown oil-seed flora which makes this scenic stretch from Eastern Serbia to Central Russia a valuable resource for all oil enthusiasts. It’s also renowned for its naturally fertile “black soil” which receives ample nourishment and rejuvenation during winter months. We are currently working with small and medium scale oil manufacturers from Western Ukraine, Poland and Baltic nations.

PROCESS HIGHLIGHTS

COLD-PRESSED

We use oil physical oil expellers where the process temperature does not exceed 40 degrees Celcius.

WILD-GROWN

Raw materials used in the manufacture of our products is strictly sourced from silviculture based farms.

UNREFINED

We do not use any chemical solvents to refine our products. We do however filter our products physically.

UNBLEACHED

We prefer retaining natural colours of our extracted oils. We do not use any bleaching agents in the process.

UNDEODORIZED

We do not deodorize our oils. Many of our clients prefer if our products retain their natural smell & aroma.

UNDILUTED

We do not dilute our extractions in base oils. You get what you see; butters or oils alike.

FEATURED PRODUCTS

Kokum  +  Mango  +  Sal  +  Mowrah  +  Tamanu  +  Milk thistle  +  Amaranth  +  Mustard  +  Sea-buckthorn  +  Rose hip  +  Pumpkin

KOKUM BUTTER

Garcinia Indica

oils-photos-kokum-butter

INCI Name: Garcinia Indica Seed Butter
Properties: Unrefined, Raw, Non-deodorized & Unbleached
Instructions: For use as an ingredient in cosmetics.
Warning: For external use only.

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Introduction: Garcinia Indica trees or simply “Kokum” (pronounced: Ko-kam) trees as they are known locally have been growing for eons in the wild, in and around the western coast of Maharashtra & Goa in India. Cottage level low scale ‘silviculture’ based cultivation of Kokum is mainly confined to the hilly areas near this long scenic coast. Supply of Kokum fruits and as a consequence Kokum seeds is limited as nursery practices have not yet been systematically worked. Kokum plantations, nurseries and farms are a rarity as a result. While limitations on quantities is a disadvantage for big businesses, the silver lining to all of this wild-grown produce is that Kokum trees which grow in the wild have not yet come into contact with chemical fertilizers and pesticides. This is one reason why Kokum butter is popular with small and medium sized formulators and exotic butter connoisseurs.

Benefits and applications: Medicinal and antioxidant properties of Kokum butter are known to be useful in cosmetic applications. It is non-pore clogging (non-comodegenic) and helps prevents drying of the skin by softening it and restoring flexibility. It’s known to helps heal ulcers, heal fissures of the lips, hands and soles of feet. Kokum butter helps regenerates skin cells & reduces degeneration of skin cells. It also contains antioxidants. It can be diluted in base creams and other oils or applied neat. Kokum butter extracted from Kokum seed kernels is one of the most stable and hard vegetable butters available in the market. This butter is solid at room temperature, but melts immediately on contact with the skin. Its triglyceride composition is uniform, and consists of up to 80% of stearic-oleic-stearic (SOS) triglycerides. Ultra purified derivatives of Kokum butter are used as substitutes & stabilizers (CBS – Cocoa butter substitute) while manufacturing chocolates so the end product doesn’t melt during transport and sale in hot summer months.

Extraction of oil/butter: The easiest and the most popular way of extracting this oil is by refining the Kokum kernels using chemical processes of neutralization, bleaching and deodorization. Upto 44% Butter can be extracted from kernels using chemical solvents making it cheaper for industrial use (bath & beauty industry). Since extraction of Kokum oil in this way is a chemical process, Kokum butter prepared from this oil no matter how well refined it is, ceases to be a 100% natural product. Moreover, when such chemically processed Kokum butter is used in cosmetics, soaps and even edibles, the end product isn’t 100% natural either! Growing demands of bleaching and deodorization coupled with a constant pressure to produce more at cheap prices have pushed most oil extractors into harnessing quick and easy chemical extraction methods. The kernels of Kokum seeds contain about 33 to 44 per cent of oil, this oil when kept at ambient temperatures has a tendency to remain in a solid state; oil in this form is commercially known as “Kokum butter”.

MANGO BUTTER

Mangifera Indica

INCI Name: Mangifera Indica Seed Butter
Properties: Unrefined, Raw, Non-deodorized & Unbleached
Instructions: For use as an ingredient in cosmetics.
Warning: For external use only.

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Introduction: Mango oil, a.k.a. mango kernel fat, or, mango butter, is a non-greasy oil fraction obtained during the processing of mango butter. Mango oil is a seed oil extracted from the stone of the fruit of the Mangifera indica. The oil is semi-solid at room temperatures, but melts on contact with skin, making it appealing for baby creams, suncare balms, hair products, and other moisturizing products. The oil is a soft yellow color with a melting point of 32-42 °C. This butter is highly emollient, softening and soothing to the skin. While mango butter is excellent for skin, it is often mixed with other ingredients because it is much harder than she butter. [ source

Benefits & applications: Mango butter is known to have moisturizing properties. It’s known to work well against ailments like dry skin, eczema and dermatitis. It’s also offers protection against harmful UV radiation and is often used in sun-screen/sun-block based cosmetic creams. It contains anti-oxidants and has anti-inflammatory and anti-ageing properties. It’s said to reduce wrinkles and stretch marks. Mango butter has protective effects against UV radiation and also helps treat skin rash, eczema, insect bites, and poison ivy. Mango butter can help protect and heal skin from the damage caused by sunburn and frostbite. 

Extraction of oil: Fat is extracted from dried mango kernels by hydraulic pressure, or by solvent extraction. In solvent extraction, hexane, a liquid hydrocarbon, is used as the extraction medium. The collected mango stones are washed with well-water soon after collection. After washing, the seeds are sun dried to reduce the moisture content to 12-15%. The dried seed stone is roasted in a drum roaster and the hull is removed mechanically, or manually by beating with wooden clubs. The separated kernels are crushed into small pieces in a hammer mill. The mango kernel pieces are conveyed to a pellet making machine and pellets are formed. The pellets are cooled to room temperature in a cooler and are conveyed to the solvent extraction plant or physical expeller. Some processors produce flakes by crushing the seeds in a flaking roller mill.

SAL BUTTER

Shorea Robusta

INCI Name: Shorea Robusta Seed Butter
Properties: Unrefined, Raw, Non-deodorized & Unbleached
Instructions: For use as an ingredient in cosmetics.
Warning: For external use only.

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Introduction: Shorea robusta seed oil is an edible oil extracted from the seeds of Shorea robusta. Shorea robusta is known as the Sal tree in India. This tree is native to the Indian Subcontinent, ranging south of the Himalaya, from Myanmar in the east to Nepal, India and Bangladesh. The tree is widely distributed in tropical regions of India and covers about 13.3% of the total forest area in the country. The most favourable soil for this tree to thrive in is a moist sandy loam with good subsoil drainage. The availability of soil moisture is an important factor determining the occurrence of S. robusta. Leaves: Leaves are simple, shiny, about 10–25 cm long and broadly oval at the base, with the apex tapering into a long point. New leaves are reddish, soon becoming delicate green. Flowers are yellowish-white, arranged in large terminal or axillary racemose panicles. Fruit at full size is about 1.3-1.5 cm long and 1 cm in diameter. The seed constitutes 33.6% of shell and contains 14-15% fat. It has calyx and wings. The de-winged seeds contain a thin, brittle seed pod. Two kilograms of seed gives one kilogram of kernel. Sal (Shorea robusta) is a major means of survival for a large number of forest dwellers in the Central Indian states of Orissa, Chhattisgarh and Madhya Pradesh. These three states include the largest sal belt of the country with sal forest area covering about 45% of their total forest area. Orissa has the largest sal forest area that covers an area of 38,300 km2, followed by Madhya Pradesh with 27,800 km2 and Chhattisgarh with 24,245 km2. Across these three states about 20-30 million forest dwellers, mostly tribals depend on collection of sal seeds, leaves and resins for their livelihood.

Benefits & applications: Sal or Shorea robusta butter is neutral smelling, creamy and soft butter which possesses moisturizing, antioxidant & anti-inflammatory properties. It helps in alleviating dry or itchy skin, eczema, dermatitis, sunburn, damaged/rough skin patches etc. It’s known to be a good tonic for dry or over processed hair. Storage of Shorea robusta seeds before processing is very crucial and important. Presence of excess moisture deteriorate the oil quality. The moisture content should not be more than 6-8% in stored seeds in any condition. The refined oil is used as substitute for cocoa butter in chocolate manufacturing.

Extraction of oil/butter: Sal fat is extracted in three methods, one among the three is traditional system. Traditionally fat is extracted by water rendering. The second widely employed mechanical system is rendering oil extraction by oil expeller and rotary mills in village level. The third method is the solvent extraction method. The extracted crude sal oil/fat is greenish-brown and has a characteristic odour. Due to the presence of more saturated fatty acids in the oil, it is solid at room temperature. Because of this, it is known as sal (Shorea robusta) fat or sal butter. The oil is used as cooking oil after refining. The oil contains Linoleic acid (omega-6) – 3.70%, Oleic acid (omega-9) – 39.50%,  Stearic acid – 39.30%, Palmitic acid – 14.10%.

MOWRAH BUTTER

Madhuca Longifolia

INCI Name: Madhuca Longifolia Seed Butter
Properties: Unrefined, Raw, Non-deodorized & Unbleached
Instructions: For use as an ingredient in cosmetics.
Warning: For external use only.

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Introduction: ‘Madhuca longifolia’ commonly known as mahua, mowha, mahwa or Iluppai, is an Indian tropical tree found largely in the central and north Indian plains and forests. It is a fast-growing tree that grows to approximately 20 meters in height, possesses evergreen or semi-evergreen foliage, and belongs to the family Sapotaceae. It is adapted to arid environments, being a prominent tree in tropical mixed deciduous forests in India in the states of West Bengal, Chhattisgarh, Jharkhand, Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, Maharashtra, Madhya Pradesh, Kerala, Gujarat and Orissa. It is cultivated in warm and humid regions for its oleaginous seeds (producing between 20 and 200 kg of seeds annually per tree, depending on maturity), flowers and wood.  

Benefits and applications: Mahuwa butter has antioxidant and emollient properties and is used to alleviate skin diseases, rheumatism and headache. It is also a natural laxative and considered to be a useful supplement to mitigate constipation, piles and haemorrhoids. It’s used in detoxifying therapies as an emetic. Tribal folk also harness it as an illuminant and hair fixer. Home made liquor produced from the flowers is largely colourless, with a whitish tinge and isn’t very strong. Mahua flowers are also used to manufacture jam, which is being made by tribal cooperatives in the Gadchiroli district of Maharashtra. The leaves of Madhuca indica (M. longifolia) are fed on by the moth Antheraea paphia, which produces tassar silk (tussah), a form of wild silk of commercial importance in India. 

Extraction of oil/butter: Tribals in Central India (across several different states of India) have been harnessing Mowrah fat/butter since eons before western pharmacists and skin-care specialists started studying this butter for its emollient properties. Mowrah butter is used for skin-care purposes and as a vegetable butter for culinary applications. It’s also used to manufacture traditional soap and detergents. The fatty acid composition of Mowrah butter is as follows: Palmitic (c16:0): 24.5%, Stearic (c18:0): 22.7%, Oleic (c18:1): 37.0%, Linoleic (c18:2): 14.3%.

TAMANU OIL

Calophyllum Inophyllum

INCI Name: Calophyllum Inophyllum Seed Oil
Properties: Unrefined, Raw, Non-deodorized & Unbleached
Instructions: For use as an ingredient in cosmetics.
Warning: For external use only.

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Introduction: The ‘Calophyllum inophyllum’ tree (a.k.a Champa or Tamanu) is native to South Sea Islands and southern coastal India, East Africa, Malaysia and Australia. In India the tree is grown widely along Coastal areas of Maharashtra, Kerala, Karnataka, Tamil Nadu, Orissa, West Bengal and the Andaman islands. It’s also grown in gardens as a decorative element and as a source of fragrance as its flowers have a strong perfume like scent. These flowers have snow-white petals with a thick center of yellow stamens. Fragrant flowers have been prized as an adornment in various traditional ceremonies, ritual offerings to Gods and simply as a perfume. Champa/Tamanu tree is a low-branching and slow-growing tree with a broad and irregular crown. It usually reaches 8 to 20 m in height with thick foliage. The tree supports a dense canopy of glossy, elliptical leaves. These trees primarily grow by the seashore, near water source or in sandy regions. Tamanu Fruits appear during May and November each year. The Tamanu fruit is a round, green drupe reaching 2 to 4 cm in diameter with a single large seed. When ripe, the fruit is wrinkled and its color varies from yellow to brownish-red.

Benefits and applications: Tamanu Oil or Calophyllum Inophyllum has traditionally been used as a unique and significant skin healing agent. It’s known to mitigate acne and is anti-septic in nature. It’s also used to clear scars caused by acne. It has a regenerative effect on the skin and increased microcirculation. It’s known to mitigate wrinkles and promote healthy glowing taut skin. In Southern India, the oil of the seeds of the plant is used specifically for treating skin diseases and wounds. It is also applied topically in cases of rheumatism. In most of the south sea islands Tamanu/Champa oil is used as an analgesic (natives use it in frictions for sciatica and rheumatism) and to cure ulcers and wounds.

Extraction of oil/butter: The kernel part in the whole dry fruit will be around 43-52%. The kernel is big in comparison at around 1.5 cm in diameter. It’s enclosed in a soft seed coat and a hard seed coat. The kernel contains 55-73% of oil. The seeds are decorticated by wooden mallets or by decorticators or by pressing under planks. Usually the kernels are pressed in traditional wooden and stone presses. The viscous oil which is extracted by cold-pressing kernels is bluish-yellow to dark green. The concentration of resinous substances in the oil varies from 10 to 30%. The main compounds of the seed oil are Oleic (36-53%), Linoleic (16-29%), Stearic (6.0-9.0%), Erucic (2.5-3.5%) and Palmitic acid (14.8-18.5%).

MILK THISTLE OIL

Silybum Marianum

milk-thistle

INCI Name: Silybum Marianum Seed Oil
Properties: Unrefined, Raw, Non-deodorized & Unbleached
Instructions: For use as an ingredient in cosmetics.
Warning: For external use only. Consult your physician before internal consumption.

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Introduction: ‘Silybum marianum’ also commonly known as Saint Mary’s thistle or simply ‘Milk Thistle’ is an annual or biennial plant of the Asteraceae family. This fairly typical thistle has red to purple flowers and shiny pale green leaves with white veins. Originally a native of Southern Europe through to Asia, it is now found throughout the world. It grows 30 to 200 cm tall with the stem being grooved and more or less cotton like. With the largest specimens the stem is hollow. The leaves are oblong to lanceolate with spiny edges. They are hairless, shiny green, with milk-white veins. The flower heads are long and wide, of red-purple colour. They flower from June to August in the North or December to February in the Southern Hemisphere (Summer through Autumn).

Benefits and applications: Milk Thistle oil is known to lower cholesterol, reduces cell damage caused by radiation and chemotherapy treatments, reducing insulin levels for those with Type-2 diabetes, reducing growth of cancer cells, preventing the onset of Alzheimer’s disease etc. It’s prescribed in higher dosages to those suffering from diabetes and Hepatitis-C. Silybum marianum seed oil has antifungal effects, preventing the growth of dermatophyte more than saprophyte fungi. One pilot study showed that milk thistle may be as effective as fluoxetine in treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder.

Extraction of oil: Traditional milk thistle extract is made from the seeds, which contain approximately 4–6% silymarin. The extract consists of about 65–80% silymarin (a flavonolignan complex) and 20–35% fatty acids, including linoleic acid. Silymarin is a complex mixture of polyphenolic molecules, including seven closely related flavonolignans (silybin A, silybin B, isosilybin A, isosilybin B, silychristin, isosilychristin, silydianin) and one flavonoid (taxifolin). Silibinin, a semipurified fraction of silymarin, is primarily a mixture of 2 diastereoisomers, silybin A and silybin B, in a roughly 1: 1 ratio.

AMARANTH OIL

Amaranthus

amaranth

INCI Name: Amaranthus Seed Oil
Properties: Unrefined, Raw, Non-deodorized & Unbleached
Instructions: For use as an ingredient in cosmetics.
Warning: For external use only.

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Introduction: Amaranth grain is thought to have represented up to 80% of caloric consumption of Aztecs before the Spanish conquest. Another important use of Amaranth throughout Mesoamerica was to prepare ritual drinks and foods. To this day, amaranth grains are toasted much like popcorn and mixed with honey, molasses or chocolate to make a treat called alegría, meaning “joy” in Spanish. Amaranth seeds contain lysine, an essential amino acid, limited in grains or other plant sources. Most fruits and vegetables do not contain a complete set of amino-acids, and thus different sources of protein must be used to create a balanced nutrition profile. Amaranth seeds are therefore a promising complement to common grains such as wheat germ, oats, and corn. Amaranth may be a promising source of protein to those who are gluten sensitive, because unlike the protein found in grains such as wheat and rye, its protein does not contain gluten. It compares well in nutrient content with gluten-free vegetarian options such as buckwheat, corn, millet, wild rice, oats and quinoa. Amaranth grain is a source of vitamin B1 (thiamin), B2 (riboflavin), D, E etc. Along with South & Middle America, it’s also a staple among countries of South Asia.

Extraction of oil/butter: It is one of the more expensive oils available in the market because the oil content of the actual Amaranth grain ranges from 4.8 to 8.1% which is considerably lower than most oil-seeds. In essence, a lot of raw material is used in order to obtain a tiny bit of Amaranth oil. Amaranth oil is a light to medium colored, clear liquid that flows easily at low temperatures, highly unsaturated with a delicate aroma and taste, allowing greater usage versatility. The melting point of amaranth oil is 27°C. Commercial uses of Amaranth oil include foods, cosmetics, shampoos and intermediates for manufacture of lubricants, pharmaceuticals, rubber chemicals, aromatics and surface active agents. Chemically, the major constituents of amaranth oil are Linoleic acid (46–50%), Oleic acid (22–26%), Palmitic acid (19–20%), Squalene (5–6%) and Stearic acid (3%). 

Benefits and applications:  It’s said that Amaranth oil when used for serious cosmetic purposes, helps mitigate ‘Naevus flammeus’, various skin irritations, dermatitis etc. It has anti-ageing qualities and is said to reduce wrinkles. Along with rice bran, wheat germ and olives, Amaranth oil is a rich source of Squalene. Squalene is a natural 30-carbon organic compound originally obtained for commercial purposes primarily from shark liver oil. It isn’t greasy and quite light after application. Squalene is one of the most common lipids produced by human skin cells since it’s a natural moisturizer. It also provides an excellent resource for omega series fatty acids. Amaranth oil is valued for its ability to add temperature stability at both high and low temperatures. As a food oil, amaranth oil has a delicate and agreeable taste. Berger et al., in a study of the cholesterol-lowering properties of Amaranth grain and oil in hamsters, report that amaranth oil significantly reduced non-HDL cholesterol and raised HDL cholesterol, as well as lowering very low density lipoprotein cholesterol (VLDL cholesterol) by 21–50%. When taken orally, Amaranth oil harmonizes cholesterol levels.

MUSTARD SEED OIL (WHITE & BROWN)

Sinapis Alba (White)
Brassica Juncea (Brown)

 

INCI Name: Sinapis Alba Seed Oil
INCI Name: Brassica Juncea Seed Oil

Properties: Unrefined, Raw, Non-deodorized & Unbleached
Instructions: For use as an ingredient in cosmetics.
Warning: For external use only.

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Introduction: White mustard (Sinapis alba / Brassica Alba) is an annual plant of the family Brassicaceae. It is sometimes also referred to as Brassica alba or B. hirta. Grown for its seeds, mustard, as fodder crop or as a green manure, it is now widespread worldwide although large concentrations are found in Western Ukraine, Southern Belarus, Russia, Belfast, Northern Ireland and it’s naturalized throughout Great Britain and Ireland. Brown mustard (Brassica juncea) is the more prevalent of the two mustard species and is widely cultivated for commercial purposes. White mustard seeds are hard round seeds, usually around 1.0 to 1.5 mm (0.039 to 0.059 in) in diameter, noticeably bigger than brown and black mustard seeds with a color ranging from beige or yellow to light brown. They can be used whole for pickling or toasted for use in dishes. Brassica juncea on the other hand is more pungent than Sinapis alba and the latter is used to produce milder tasting sauces.

Benefits and applications: Mustard oil is known to be effective in removing tan and dark spots. It helps create a glowing complexion by increasing microcirculation. It helps in opening clogged pores of the skin as it stimulates the process of sweating. This helps in reducing body temperature and removes unwanted toxins from the body. It’s an effective anti-bacterial/anti-fungal oil and helps in treating skin rashes and infections. It’s anti-inflammatory as well and helps the outer dermal tissue heal wounds, cuts and scars quickly. It’s also used as a lip moisturizer for chronically chapped lips. It’s a natural sunscreen as it protects the skin from harmful ultraviolet rays of the sun. It’s a miraculous tonic for hair as it stimulates hair growth by increasing blood circulation in the scalp. It’s packed with a high proportion of beta-carotene which also promotes hair growth. It helps in treating dry and damaged hair and prevents scalp infections by inhibiting fungal growth.

Extraction of oil: Cold pressed oil of mustard seeds is not as pungent as activated mustard essential oil. White mustard seeds contain ‘sinalbin’, which is a thioglycoside responsible for their pungent taste. White mustard has fewer volatile oils and the flavor is considered to be milder than that produced by brown or black mustard seeds.

SEA-BUCKTHORN BERRY OIL

Hippophae Rhamnoides*

*Sea-buckthorn Berry Oil is the only oil in our list which is extracted with the aid of raw fresh sunflower seed oil. This is to encourage the process of oil extraction from dried Sea-buckthorn berries. While it isn’t diluted in the technical sense of the term, one will find upto 10% of raw sunflower oil in the final product.

sea-buckthorn

INCI Name: Hippophae Rhamnoides Berry Oil
Properties: Unrefined, Raw, Non-deodorized & Unbleached
Instructions: For use as an ingredient in cosmetics.
Warning: For external use only.

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Introduction: Sea-buckthorn identifies a group of species in the genus ‘Hippophae’, the most commonly used of which is ‘Hippophae rhamnoides’. Oil can be extracted from either the seeds or the pulp of the fruit. Hippophae rhamnoides, the common sea-buckthorn, is by far the most widespread of the species in the genus, with the ranges of its eight subspecies extending from the Atlantic coasts of Europe across to northwestern Mongolia and northwestern China. In western Europe, it is largely confined to sea coasts where salt spray off the sea prevents other larger plants from outcompeting it, but in central Asia, it is more widespread in dry semidesert sites where other plants cannot survive the dry conditions. More than 90% or about 1,500,000 ha (5,800 sq mi) of the world’s natural sea-buckthorn habitat is found in China, Russia, northern Europe and Canada where the plant is used for soil, water and wildlife conservation purposes and for consumer products.

Benefits and applications: Sea buckthorn oil is well-known today for its healing and rejuvenating effects on the skin. It promotes skin hydration, elasticity, and skin regeneration, and even helps treat and prevent acne. Sea buckthorn oil may also be beneficial for rosacea, a chronic inflammatory condition that causes small red bumps on the face. When used topically, it’s a great natural cleanser and exfoliator. It can also help heal burns, cuts, wounds, sunburn, rashes, and other types of skin damage. Using sea buckthorn oil daily helps slow down the signs of aging by nourishing the tissues in your skin and body. In Mongolia, Russia, and China, pulp oil may also be used topically to treat skin burns from radiation. Due to its unique botanical and nutritional properties, and there being no reported evidence of sea-buckthorn oil causing adverse reactions or negative side effects, the oil is also used as a natural agent that may benefit diseases of mucous membranes including aphthous ulcers, esophagitis, acid reflux, and peptic ulcers, as well as dermatological diseases and skin conditions. Sea buckthorn oil has also been marketed by cosmetic and health companies as an anti-aging cure.

Extraction of oil: Oils from sea-buckthorn seeds and pulp differ considerably in fatty acid composition. While linoleic acid and α-Linolenic acid are the major fatty acids in seed oil, sea buckthorn pulp oil contains approximately 65% combined of the monounsaturated fatty acid, palmitoleic acid, and the saturated fatty acid, palmitic acid. Few other vegetable oils contain a similar quantity of these fatty acids. Both the seed and pulp oils are rich in tocopherols, tocotrienols and plant sterols. In addition, the pulp oil contains especially high levels of carotenoids.

ROSE HIP OIL

Rose Canina

rose-hip

INCI Name: Fructus Rosae Seed Oil
Properties: Unrefined, Raw, Non-deodorized & Unbleached
Instructions: For use as an ingredient in cosmetics.
Warning: For external use only.

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Introduction: ‘Rose hip’ seed oil is a pressed seed oil, extracted from the seeds of a wild rose bush (Rosa moschata or Rosa rubiginosa) in the southern Andes. Rosehip seed oil can also be extracted from Rosa canina, which grows in many regions of the world including South Africa and Europe.

Benefits and applications: Rose hip oil is commonly used in skin care products. It is commonly used for a variety of skin conditions, including dermatitis, acne and eczema, for mature and sun burnt skin as well as brittle nails and wrinkles. It quickly absorbs into the skin replenishing moisture and creates a protective barrier on the skin to help prevent dehydration. Rose hip oil is also frequently used to heal scarring and diminish aging as it is known to reduce wrinkles and fine lines. While Rose hip oil doesn’t protect the skin from UV rays, it does contain antioxidants which can help mitigate photo-aging (damage caused by UV rays). This . The essential fatty acids in rose hip seed oil can help reduce scarring and promote skin regeneration. Emollients in the oil along with Vitamin A help in restoring the texture of skin and help in reducing scar tissue via gentle exfoliation. It also helps reduce pigmentation.

Extraction of oil: Cold pressed oil of Rose hip seeds is bright red-orange in colour and fluid in consistency at ambient temperatures. The oil contains provitamin A (mostly beta-Carotene).  It also contains levels (up to .357 ml/L) of tretinoin or all-trans retinoic acid, a vitamin A acid that retinol converts to. Rose hip seed oil is high in the essential fatty acids: linoleic acid or omega-6, and linolenic acid or omega-3.

PUMPKIN SEED OIL

Cucurbita Pepo

pumpkin

INCI Name: Cucurbita Pepo Seed Oil
Properties: Unrefined, Raw, Non-deodorized & Unbleached
Instructions: For use as an ingredient in cosmetics.
Warning: For external use only.

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Introduction: Pumpkin seed oil (Kernöl or Kürbiskernöl in German), is a culinary specialty of south eastern Austria, Slovenia, Central Transylvania, Romania, Croatia and adjacent regions of Hungary. It is made by pressing roasted, hulled pumpkin seeds (pepitas).

Benefits and applications: Pumpkin seed oil (PSO) is rich in vitamin E, zinc, omega 3- and 6- fatty acids as well as antioxidants. High concentration of zinc in Pumpkin seed oil helps in fighting acne. It’s regenerative properties imparted due to the presence of Vitamin E help in healing affected areas of the skin. It has antioxidant anti-aging properties as well as it helps in fighting skin damage caused by free radicals.Pumpkin seed oil has an intense nutty taste and is rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids. Browned oil has a bitter taste. Pumpkin seed oil serves as a salad dressing when combined with honey or olive oil. A typical dressing consists of pumpkin seed oil and cider vinegar. The oil is also used for desserts, giving ordinary vanilla ice cream a nutty taste.

Extraction of oil: Pumpkin seed oil is produced by pressing roasted, hulled pumpkin seeds (pepitas). The viscous oil is light to very dark green to dark red in colour depending on the thickness of the observed sample. The oil appears green in thin layer and red in thick layer. Such optical phenomenon is called dichromatism. Pumpkin oil is one of the substances with strongest dichromatism. Its Kreft’s dichromaticity index is -44. Used together with yoghurt, the colour turns to bright green and is sometimes referred to as “green-gold”. It’s fatty acid composition is as follows;  Myristic acid 0.09-0.27%, Palmitic acid 12.6-18.4%, Palmitoleic acid 0.12-0.52%, Stearic acid 5.1-8.5%, Oleic acid 17.0-39.5%, Linoleic acid 18.1-62.8%, Linolenic acid 0.34-0.82%, Arachidic acid 0.26-1.12%, Gadoleic acid 0-0.17% and Behenic acid 0.12-0.58%.

Kokum  +  Mango  +  Sal  +  Mowrah  +  Tamanu  +  Milk thistle  +  Amaranth  +  Mustard  +  Sea-buckthorn  +  Rose hip  +  Pumpkin